News

Voting begins in McLean Community Center governing board elections

Clockwise from top left: Amirthalingam Thillaichidambaram, Matt Colsia, Katie Gorka and Kathleen Cooney Porter (courtesy MCC)

The McLean Community Center’s efforts to attract the attention of a younger generation appear to be paying off.

Earlier this week, the organization announced a robust slate of candidates for its upcoming governing board election that includes five adults and 10 teens — more than tripling the number of kids who competed in last year’s elections.

Voters will once again choose three adult board members and two teens, one representing students in the McLean High School boundary area and the other representing the Langley High School area.

Open to all residents of MCC’s tax district, absentee voting began today (Wednesday) and will continue through 5 p.m. on May 17. The official election will be held at the annual McLean Day festival from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 20, at Lewinsville Park (1659 Chain Bridge Road).

Absentee ballots can be requested online, by phone (703-744-9348) or by email at elections@mcleancenter.org. They can be dropped off in-person at the McLean Community Center (1234 Ingleside Avenue) or sent by mail.

The candidates certified for this year’s election are:

Adults

  • Gloria Marrero Chambers
  • Matt Colsia
  • Katie Gorka
  • Kathleen Cooney Porter
  • Lincom (aka Amirthalingam Thillaichidambaram)

Teens — Langley High School

  • Sophia Bruno
  • Cabot Fisher
  • Charlotte Loving
  • Duy Nguyen
  • Ethan Pwu
  • Sonya Thott

Teens — McLean High School

  • Eleanor Ague
  • Rafik Hanna
  • Katy Perez-Nesmith
  • Philip Rotondo

The slate features a couple of familiar names. Current Langley representative Charlotte Loving is seeking another term, and former Trump administration official Katherine Gorka is making another bid for a seat after falling short last year.

Personal statements submitted by each candidate can be found on MCC’s website.

The 11-member governing board oversees the community center’s budget, programs and facilities. Adults serve three-year terms, while the youth members serve for one year.