Post Content

Morning Notes

The “Ascent” sculpture at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly (staff photo by Angela Woolsey)

Rabies Confirmed in Biting Coyote — The Fairfax County Health Department confirmed yesterday (Monday) that a coyote that bit four people and two dogs over the weekend in the Lake Accotink area was infected with rabies. Anyone who touched or was bitten or scratched by the animal should call the county health department’s rabies program at 703-246-2433, TTY 711. [FCHD]

Confederate Soldier’s Tombstone Defaced — The letters ‘CS,’ ‘NVA,’ and a Star of David were spraypainted on the tombstone of Armistead T. Thompson in the Thompson Family Cemetery by the Pan Am Shopping Center in Merrifield. Fairfax County police received a report last Tuesday (May 31) and said the property management is working to remove it, though as of Sunday (June 5), the graffiti was still there. [Patch]

Homicide Investigation in Reston Continues — “Detectives and officers are canvassing in the area of Springs Apartments & Hunters Woods Plaza in Reston after Rene Alberto Pineda Sanchez was found deceased on May 31. Call detectives at 703-246-7800, option 2 w/any info.” [FCPD/Twitter]

Inova Opens Northern Virginia’s First LGBTQ-Focused Clinic — “Inova’s Pride Clinic will be open to anyone who needs services. It will begin small as a primary care practice for patients of all ages and then grow to include specialties…The Inova Pride Clinic ribbon-cutting will be Wednesday, June 8 at 10 a.m. in Falls Church at 500 North Washington St., Suite 200.” [WTOP]

Tysons Emergency Is Now Open — “HCA Virginia held a grand opening ceremony on Friday, June 3, 2022 for its new freestanding emergency room in Northern Virginia…The state-of-the-art ER will be staffed with board-certified emergency medicine physicians and nurses, 24-hours a day, 365 days a year, just like an emergency room that is housed within the walls of a hospital.” [HCA Virginia]

County Puts Food Inspection Reports Online — “The public can now access retail food establishment inspection reports more quickly and easily, as part of an update to the county’s new online PLUS platform…Environmental health staff inspect restaurants and other retail food service establishments to make sure employees follow safe food handling practices, covering sanitation, food storage and preparation, and have adequate kitchen facilities.” [FCHD]

Wolf Trap Nonprofit Awarded by Governor — A provider of short-term, overnight care for children with intellectual disabilities, Jill’s House was honored on May 26 with the second ‘Spirit of Virginia Award’ given by Gov. Glenn Youngkin and First Lady Suzanne Youngkin since they took office in January. The organization has served more than 1,000 families since it opened in 2010. [Sun Gazette]

Annandale Park Gets Clean-up — “A big thank you to community volunteers who came out to Backlick Park this past weekend and held a spring clean-up. This successful venture was a wonderful way to mark World Environment Day and the National Great Outdoors Month.” [FCPA/Twitter]

Chantilly Neighborhood Watch on the Lookout for Thievery — “Rob, 53, was already a neighborhood watcher in his Brookfield community…before the ransacking incident two years ago but he said it made him increasingly aware neighborhood watch is a needed position to mitigate this from happening to one of his neighbors.” [Fairfax County Times]

It’s Tuesday — Mostly cloudy throughout the day. High of 74 and low of 62. Sunrise at 5:45 am and sunset at 8:34 pm. [Weather.gov]

0 Comments
Chestnut Grove Cemetery in Herndon (via Google Maps)

Chestnut Grove Cemetery, a historic cemetery deeded to the Town of Herndon, is poised to increase fees for burials, lots and other services.

As part of ongoing budget discussions for fiscal year 2023, the town is considering increasing fees by between 13.5 and 15% for most lots.

According to staff, that’s partly because of a decrease in the number of burial sites at the property, which was first formally recognized as a cemetery in 1872. The cemetery was deeded to the town in 1997 by the Chestnut Grove Cemetery Association.

The cemetery also needs “additional funding support to maintain enterprise fund operations,” according to a staff memo. The cemetery has roughly 200 traditional sites remaining.

The fee increases come as the town explores possibilities of developing 3.5 acres for more burial sites, according to cemetery manager David Roscue.

“We are currently satisfying the demand and have not had any families choose a different location due to availability issues,” Roscue told FFXnow.

Next year, the town plans to begin design and engineering for more sites at the cemetery, but no formal plans have been made yet, according to Town of Herndon spokesperson Anne Curtis.

Fees for cremation sites are expected to go up by around $300 with similar increases for interments. Fees for the perpetual care of infants and children are not expected to be impacted, according to the draft resolution.

Roscue added that services have generally resumed to normal pre-pandemic operations, noting that the cemetery currently has no limits on the numbers of people attending a graveside service.

If approved, fee changes would go into effect on July 1. The Herndon Town Council was scheduled to discuss the matter at a meeting last night (Tuesday).

Photo via Google Maps

0 Comments

A damaged headstone for a Revolutionary War patriot is being replaced, part of a sweeping effort to preserve cemeteries in Fairfax County.

The headstone for Francis Summers is located in the Summers Family Cemetery in Lincolnia, where the remains of a few dozen people have been buried. A rededication ceremony is planned for 11 a.m. on April 30 at the site, which is located on Lincolnia Road between Deming Avenue and Barnum Lane.

The county, which took over the cemetery in 1989, launched an initiative this year to re-survey and document all non-commercial cemeteries, Aimee Wells, a senior archaeologist with Fairfax County’s Archaeology and Collections Branch, said in an email.

“The Archaeology and Collections Branch is working with their partners at the Virginia Department of Historic Resources as well as other public agencies on this survey work, which will take a few years to complete but will be made public when it is finished,” Wells said.

A previous marker identified Summers as a soldier, but he would have been in his 40s when the war started.

“He was actually a patriot, which means he helped out financially,” said Mary Lipsey, a Fairfax County Cemetery Preservation Association director and county History Commission member.

Summers lived from 1732 to 1800 and has been recognized for his Revolutionary War connection by the county, the state and historical groups.

According to Wells, the Summers Family Cemetery project involves a public-private partnership that includes restoration work on iron fences as well as several markers.

Local chapters of the nonprofit Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) have been assisting, contracting a stone conservator to replace the headstone and helping with cleanups at the cemetery, Wells said.

The Sons of the American Revolution provided grant money to the DAR.

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list