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Flooding on Old Courthouse Road in Vienna (file photo)

Fairfax County is under a Flood Watch until midnight.

The National Weather Service issued the watch this morning, noting flash flooding caused by excessive rainfall is possible after 3 p.m.

Showers and thunderstorms are expected later this afternoon into the evening, according to the National Weather Service. There will be heavy rainfall at times, with predicted rainfall amounts of 1 to 3 inches within the span of a couple of hours, according to the Flood Watch.

A Hazardous Weather Outlook in the county states damaging winds and hail are also possible.

Showers and thunderstorms are likely, mainly between 3 PM and 11
PM. A Flash Flood Watch for potential flash flooding is in effect
near and west of Interstate 95 during this time. Isolated
instances of flooding can`t be ruled out further east.

In addition, a few storms may become severe with damaging wind
gusts and large hail. An isolated tornado can`t be ruled out.

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Lightning (via Breno Machado/Unsplash)

Updated at 6:50 p.m. — The Severe Thunderstorm Watch was canceled at 6:41 p.m., according to a National Weather Service alert.

Earlier: Fairfax County is under a Severe Thunderstorm Watch, and part of the county is also under a Severe Thunderstorm Warning.

The county is under a severe thunderstorm watch until midnight, according to the National Weather Service. There’s also a severe thunderstorm warning for west central Fairfax County, including Burke and Chantilly, until 6:15 p.m.

“Damaging winds will cause some trees and large branches to fall,” the warning reads. “This could injure those outdoors, as well as damage homes and vehicles. Roadways may become blocked by downed trees. Localized power outages are possible. Unsecured light objects may become projectiles.”

The watch was issued at 5:11 p.m. Ready Fairfax said to expect damaging winds and large hail. Isolated tornadoes are possible.

The full watch is below.

Event:
Severe Thunderstorm Watch
Alert:
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH 378 REMAINS VALID UNTIL MIDNIGHT EDT
TONIGHT FOR THE FOLLOWING AREAS
IN VIRGINIA THIS WATCH INCLUDES 22 COUNTIES
IN CENTRAL VIRGINIA
ALBEMARLE CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE
CITY OF FREDERICKSBURG GREENE
KING GEORGE NELSON ORANGE
SPOTSYLVANIA
IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA
ARLINGTON CITY OF ALEXANDRIA CITY OF FAIRFAX
CITY OF FALLS CHURCH CITY OF MANASSAS
CITY OF MANASSAS PARK CULPEPER
FAIRFAX FAUQUIER LOUDOUN
PRINCE WILLIAM STAFFORD
IN NORTHWEST VIRGINIA
MADISON RAPPAHANNOCK
THIS INCLUDES THE CITIES OF ALEXANDRIA, ARLINGTON, CHANTILLY,
CHARLOTTESVILLE, CROZET, CULPEPER, DAHLGREN, FAIRFAX,
FALLS CHURCH, FALMOUTH, FREDERICKSBURG, GORDONSVILLE, GREENFIELD,
HERNDON, LEESBURG, MADISON, MANASSAS, MANASSAS PARK, MCLEAN,
ORANGE, RESTON, SPOTSYLVANIA COURTHOUSE, STANARDSVILLE, STERLING,
WARRENTON, WASHINGTON, AND WOODBRIDGE.
Instructions:

Target Area:
Albemarle
Arlington
City of Alexandria
City of Charlottesville
City of Fairfax
City of Falls Church
City of Fredericksburg
City of Manassas
City of Manassas Park
Culpeper
Fairfax
Fauquier
Greene
King George
Loudoun
Madison
Nelson
Orange
Prince William
Rappahannock
Spotsylvania
Stafford

Photo via Breno Machado/Unsplash

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Raindrops in puddles (staff photo by Jay Westcott)

The rain now passing through Fairfax County could lead to flash flooding this afternoon and evening (Thursday).

The National Weather Service has issued a Flood Watch for much of the D.C. area that’s currently set to be in effect until 8 p.m.

Here is more from the alert:

* IMPACTS…Excessive runoff may result in flooding of rivers, creeks, streams, and other low-lying and flood-prone locations. Flooding may occur in poor drainage and urban areas.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…
– A strong surface trough has settled over the I 95 corridor and has become the focus for the formation of strong thunderstorms. PWs greater than 1.7 inches combined with the potential for training storms capable of producing 2 to 3 inches per hour may lead to an increased threat for flash flooding over the more urban areas along the I-95 corridor. One to two inches of rain are likely within training storms with locally higher amounts around 4 inches are possible.

The region is also under a Severe Thunderstorm Watch until 9 p.m.

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A map shows areas across Virginia and the D.C. region under a tornado watch (via NWS Baltimore-Washington/Twitter)

(Updated at 12:55 p.m.) Tornado and storm warnings briefly usurped earlier weather alerts for Fairfax County as the National Weather Service noted potential dangers and hazards across the region.

“Damaging winds will cause some trees and large branches to fall. This could injure those outdoors, as well as damage homes and vehicles,” NWS said in a Severe Thunderstorm Warning alert. “Roadways may become blocked by downed trees. Localized power outages are possible. Unsecured light objects may become projectiles.”

An NWS Baltimore-Washington news feed noted just before noon that a Tornado Warning was in effect for parts of Reston and Great Falls until 12:15 p.m. today (Friday). A watch means tornadoes are possible, whereas warnings mean that they are spotted or indicated by radar.

Fairfax County and surrounding areas were also subject to a Severe Thunderstorm Warning until 12:30 p.m. today.

Previously, the National Weather Service issued a Tornado Watch around 6:20 a.m. today that’s in effect until 2 p.m. for Fairfax County and the D.C. region.

Tornadoes, damaging wind gusts and large hail are possible, the NWS said in the earlier alert.

The NWS Baltimore-Washington said on Twitter that scattered gusts could possibly reach 70 mph.

The NWS also issued a Flood Watch at 4:33 a.m. for the county and surrounding areas from 11 a.m. through 11 p.m. today. A NWS meteorologist warned that flash flooding is possible due to excessive rainfall.

“Multiple rounds of thunderstorms producing heavy rainfall may lead to scattered instances of flash flooding,” the NWS said.

Due to the storm risks, the county is under a Hazardous Weather Outlook, per the Fairfax County Office of Emergency Management:

Multiple rounds of showers and thunderstorms are likely starting this morning and continuing through this evening. Localized rainfall totals of 1 to 3 inches are expected, though locations that experience multiple rounds of thunderstorms could exceed 3 inches.

If you’re driving, don’t pass through flooded roads. Turn around, don’t drown. Also, keep children away from creeks and streams that may rise rapidly.

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Rain with hail in Vienna (staff photo by Angela Woolsey)

Updated at 7:25 p.m. — A Flood Warning has now been issued for Fairfax County, with an additional half to 1.5 inches of rain possible until 1:15 a.m. Monday. The Severe Thunderstorm Warning has also been extended to 8 p.m.

Earlier: A Severe Thunderstorm Warning is in effect for Fairfax County.

The National Weather Service issued the alert shortly after 5 p.m., warning of 60 mph wind gusts and quarter-sized hail:

IMPACT…Damaging winds will cause some trees and large branches to fall. This could injure those outdoors, as well as damage homes and vehicles. Roadways may become blocked by downed trees. Localized power outages are possible. Unsecured light objects may become projectiles.

Moving eastward, the storm has already made its way through Herndon and just passed the Town of Vienna, bringing a couple minutes of intense rain, thunder, and hail that ended as quickly as it began.

This is the second thunderstorm with hail to hit the D.C. area within the past week, and it came a day after temperatures hit a high of 92 degrees, according to NWS data.

While the warning is set to end at 6 p.m., a Severe Thunderstorm Watch is currently in effect until 9 p.m.

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Power outages following Monday’s thunderstorm are concentrated along the Route 1 corridor (via Dominion Energy)

(Updated at 6:30 p.m.) The thunderstorm has passed, but it has left some destruction in its wake, taking out electricity for more than 8,000 people in Fairfax County.

According to PowerOutage.US, there are currently 8,707 customers without power in the county.

The worst damage is in the Groveton and Hybla Valley area along Route 1, where around 5,835 Dominion Energy customers are currently without power, according to the utility company’s outage map.

Outages have also affected over 500 customers in Springfield.

The outages come after a thunderstorm hit the D.C. area earlier this afternoon (Monday), prompting reports of quarter-sized hail.

The National Weather Service issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning for Fairfax County until 4:45 p.m.:

HAZARD…70 mph wind gusts and half dollar size hail.

SOURCE…Radar indicated.

IMPACT…Damaging winds will cause some trees and large branches to fall. This could injure those outdoors, as well as damage homes and vehicles. Roadways may become blocked by
downed trees. Localized power outages are possible. Unsecured light objects may become projectiles.

* Locations impacted include… Arlington, Alexandria, Centreville, Waldorf, Dale City, Annandale, Clinton, Springfield, Fort Washington, Fairfax, Fort Hunt, Vienna, Groveton, Falls Church, Huntington, Coral Hills, Mantua, Fort Belvoir, Woodbridge and National Harbor.

NWS urges residents to move to an interior room on the lowest floor of a building.

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch was also issued for the county. It was expected to last until 9 p.m., but got canceled shortly before 5:30 p.m. after the storm moved on.

Angela Woolsey contributed to this report.

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Raindrops collect on tree buds in Fairview Park (staff photo by Jay Westcott)

The National Weather Service has issued a Flood Watch for Fairfax County and the rest of the D.C. area.

The alert is set to take effect at 5 p.m. today (Friday) and last until 2 a.m. tomorrow (Saturday), though current forecasts indicate that rain is likely to continue throughout the weekend.

“Widespread rainfall totals of 1-3 inches are expected through tonight,” the NWS said. “This may lead to localized instances of flooding.”

Here is more from the alert:

…FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH LATE TONIGHT…

* WHAT…Flooding caused by excessive rainfall is possible.

* WHERE…DC and portions of Maryland and northern Virginia, including the following areas: the District of Columbia. In Maryland, Anne Arundel, Central and Southeast Howard, Central and
Southeast Montgomery, Northwest Howard, Northwest Montgomery, Prince Georges and Southern Baltimore. In northern Virginia, Arlington/Falls Church/Alexandria, Eastern Loudoun, Fairfax,
Northern Fauquier, Prince William/Manassas/Manassas Park and Western Loudoun.

* WHEN…From this afternoon through late tonight.

* IMPACTS…Excessive runoff may result in flooding of rivers, creeks, streams, and other low-lying and flood-prone locations.

The NWS advises continuing to monitor forecasts and staying alert for possible Flood Warnings.

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Snow on mushroom statues on Vienna (staff photo by Angela Woolsey)

We’re a couple weeks into spring now, but that won’t stop a chill from settling in Fairfax County early tomorrow morning (Monday).

The National Weather Service has issued a Frost Advisory set to take effect in the D.C. area from midnight to 9 a.m.

…FROST ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM MIDNIGHT TONIGHT TO 9 AM EDT MONDAY…

* WHAT…Temperatures around 33 to 36 degrees will result in frost formation.

* WHERE…The Washington and Baltimore Metropolitan areas, northern and central Maryland as well as northern and central Virginia.

* WHEN…From midnight tonight to 9 AM EDT Monday.

* IMPACTS…Frost could kill sensitive outdoor vegetation if left uncovered.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

Take steps now to protect tender plants from the cold.

For those less than enthused about the frigid weather, fear not: forecasts indicate that temperatures will leap up to a high of 80 degrees Fahrenheit on Wednesday (April 13), albeit with a slight chance of showers.

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Heavy rains and damage came after a storm blasted through Tysons on Thursday (via @RealPotatus)

Fairfax County was, in fact, hit by two tornados during last week’s rainstorm.

The National Weather Service determined there was a tornado in Centreville on Thursday (March 31), in addition to the one that touched down in Tysons.

The tornado had peak winds of 85 miles per hour, according to NWS, which conducted a damage survey today (Monday).

Approximately 15 pine trees were snapped or uprooted at the end of Batavia Drive behind Cub Run Elementary School.

“No damage to nearby residences or other structures was evident during the survey,” the report reads. “The tornado was on the ground for well under a minute.”

The NWS estimates the tornado tore an about 80-yard path with a width of 30 feet around 8:21 p.m.

The Tysons hurricane didn’t touch down until about 20 minutes later and was also rated as an EF0 but damaged two gas stations.

Read the full NWS damage survey below:

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Baltimore MD/Washington DC
440 PM EDT Mon Apr 4 2022

…NWS Damage Survey for 03/31/22 Tornado in Centreville VA…

Rating: EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind: 85 mph
Path Length: 80 yards
Path Width /maximum/: 30 yards
Fatalities: 0
Injuries: 0

Start Date: March 31, 2022
Start Time: 8:21 PM EDT
Start Location: Centreville VA
Start Lat/Lon: 38.8653/-77.4579

End Date: March 31, 2022
End Time: 8:22 PM EDT
End Location: Centreville VA
End Lat/Lon: 38.8655/-77.4570

Narrative:

Today, the National Weather Service in Sterling, Virginia, conducted a survey of storm damage in Centreville, Virgina, of localized damage from storms that occurred Thursday evening, March 31, 2022.

It was determined that a brief tornado occurred in Centreville, Virginia, near the end of Batavia Drive behind Cub Run Elementary School. Multiple softwood pine trees surrounding the end of Batavia Drive were impacted/damaged by the tornado, with several snapped and others uprooted. No damage to nearby residences or other structures was evident during the survey. The tornado was on the ground for well under a minute.

The tornado touched down immediately east of Cub Run Elementary School and transited from west to east toward the cul-de-sac at the end of Batavia Drive. The cul-de-sac was formerly surrounded by about two dozen trees. The seven trees on the south side of the cul-de-sac were undamaged, while most of the remainder were either uprooted, snapped at the base, or snapped 10-15 feet in the air. One of the tree tops was turned in mid-air and landed
opposite to its expected orientation had this been straight-line winds, indicative of a very brief tornado touchdown.

The tornado lifted as it moved east of the cul-de-sac.

Weather radars from NOAA/NWS KLWX WSR-88D in Sterling, VA, and FAA Terminal Doppler Weather Radars for Reagan National Airport, and Joint Base Andrews, all had corroborating doppler radar velocity data supporting the tornadogenesis.

EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into the following categories:

EF0………65 to 85 mph
EF1………86 to 110 mph
EF2………111 to 135 mph
EF3………136 to 165 mph
EF4………166 to 200 mph
EF5………>200 mph

Photo courtesy of @RealPotatus 

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Tysons Sunoco and Mobil gas stations were damaged by a storm Thursday night (staff photo by David Taube)

(updated at 4:20 p.m.) The National Weather Service determined a tornado touched down in Tysons last night (Thursday).

NWS confirmed what some suspected after onlookers posted videos to social media showing what looked like a funnel.

The tornado, which was the lowest category with winds between 65 to 85 mph, caused damage to two gas stations along Chain Bridge Road. NWS reported the winds lifted upward under the canopy of the Sunoco and caused a corner of it to collapse on the station’s building.

Rating: EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind: 85 mph
Path Length: 200 yards
Path Width /maximum/: 50 yards
Fatalities: 0
Injuries: 0

At the Mobil not too far away, the garage door “was blown 10 to 15 feet away from the building.”

The Capital Weather Gang had reported there may have also been a brief tornado touchdown near Centreville based on preliminary information. But National Weather Service meteorologist Ray Martin told FFXnow this afternoon (Friday) that the agency hadn’t heard of much damage in that area to indicate a tornado or prompt a survey.

Read the full report below:

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Baltimore MD/Washington DC
305 PM EDT Fri Apr 1 2022

…NWS Damage Survey for 03/31/22 Tornado in Tysons Corner VA…

Rating: EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind: 85 mph
Path Length: 200 yards
Path Width /maximum/: 50 yards
Fatalities: 0
Injuries: 0

Start Date: March 31, 2022
Start Time: 8:41 PM EDT
Start Location: Tysons Corner VA
Start Lat/Lon: 38.9196/-77.2259

End Date: March 31, 2022
End Time: 8:42 PM EDT
End Location: Tysons Corner VA
End Lat/Lon: 38.9195/-77.2234

Narrative:

A tornado touched down in Tysons Corner, Virginia, along Chain Bridge Road just northwest of the Tysons Corner Mall. Two service stations were impacted/damaged by the tornado. The first one, a Sunoco gas station situated at the corner of Chain Bridge Road and International Drive, had a partial canopy collapse. Winds lifted upwards under the canopy and caused the northwest corner of the canopy to collapse on the service station building.

A group of bushes separating the two service stations experienced significant vegetation loss on the southeast facing side. The Mobil gas station separated approximately 120 feet from the Sunoco gas station experienced a number of impacts to the building and surrounding objects. A garage door facing northwest was blown 10 to 15 feet away from the building. Metal paneling at the top of the roof along the northwest and southeast facing sides of the building were damaged and tossed away from the building. A small canopy hanging over the entrance of the service station was mangled beyond repair. A video posted on social media displayed a number of loose items, including packs of water and other small items tossed around in a rotating fashion in the front of the building. Flying debris also caused at least 6-8 windows in the front of the Mobil station to shatter.

Eyewitness accounts along with a social media report show the tornado as it just passed the Mobil gas station and was approximately 100 yards away with clear rotation in the video as it approached just northwest of Tysons Corner Mall just off of Tysons One Place. Based off of lack of damage displayed further southeast, the tornado likely dissipated in the Tyson’s Corner Mall parking lot.

Finally, weather radars from NOAA/NWS KLWX WSR-88D in Sterling, VA, and FAA Terminal Doppler Weather Radars for Dulles International Airport, Reagan National Airport, and Joint Base Andrews, all had corroborating velocity data supporting the tornadogenesis.

EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into the following categories:

EF0………65 to 85 mph
EF1………86 to 110 mph
EF2………111 to 135 mph
EF3………136 to 165 mph
EF4………166 to 200 mph
EF5………>200 mph

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