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A conceptual rendering for The Block at Scotts Run, which will occupy a currently vacant lot in Tysons (via Fairfax County/VIKA Virginia)

Will it be a hub for food trucks? How about an indoor spa, or a trampoline park with pop-up retail stalls? Why not all of the above?

Cityline Partners, the developer behind the Scotts Run neighborhood in Tysons, can let its imagination run wild — to a point — after the Fairfax County Planning Commission approved its proposal on Wednesday (April 27) to “activate” the 1600 block of Anderson Road.

Right now, the empty 3.5-acre lot is serving as a construction staging area while work continues on Heming, a 28-story apartment complex with retail set to open at Scotts Run next year.

Under the approved development plan, Cityline can add recreational, entertainment, and pop-up retail and restaurant activities to the site on an interim basis for the next 20 years.

“We think this is an exciting opportunity to bring life to this gateway at Tysons East,” said Holland & Knight land use attorney David Schneider, who represented the developer at the planning commission’s public hearing.

Located across the street from The Kingston and Haden apartment buildings and within a mile of the McLean Metro station, The Block at Scotts Run can host activations that fall under five categories:

  • Quasi-public park
  • Outdoor commercial recreation
  • Indoor commercial recreation
  • Retail
  • Restaurant

Those are broad categories, as defined by the county’s recently updated zoning code. Outdoor commercial recreation, for example, encompasses everything from mini golf to drive-in movie theaters and amusement park rides.

There will be a 90-foot height limit and a maximum of 30,000 square feet of gross floor area, but the plan is intended to be flexibile, allowing the site to change with the seasons and the community’s needs. Read More

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Developer LCOR has proposed a more mixed-use neighborhood, McLean Crossing, to replace the Commons of McLean (via Fairfax County)

The Commons of McLean’s days are numbered.

As anticipated, developer LCOR has filed a new plan with Fairfax County for the Tysons East apartment complex that provides fewer housing units in favor of more commercial space, including potential senior living, office and hotel facilities.

Though the overall density proposed is about the same, the new McLean Crossing plan splits the 2.6 million square feet up across 12 buildings instead of the seven mostly residential buildings previously approved in 2013.

“The Applicant has determined that an infusion of a mix of uses is needed to allow this community to develop and prosper, and become a truly activated urban neighborhood in keeping with the vision for Tysons,” Walsh Colucci senior land use attorney Elizabeth Baker said in an April 22 statement of justification on the developer’s behalf.

Building off of the Kingston apartments, which opened in 2018 as the only element of the 2013 plan to come to fruition, McLean Crossing will cover approximately 18.7 acres of land along Anderson Road, just east of Route 123 and the McLean Metro station.

Constructed in 1966, all of the Commons buildings will be demolished, according to the proposed redevelopment plan.

To replace them, LCOR has put forward three possible scenarios: base development, which would provide the most non-residential uses; Option 1, which would have the most residential uses; and Option 2, which would have the most office space.

In all cases, the plan calls for at least 1.7 million square feet of development with 6.44 acres of public park space — slightly shy of the 6.46 acres required for that amount of development.

The proposed parks include a full-sized athletic field called Goodman Field. Anderson Park, located by the intersection of Anderson and Colshire Drive, will have two playgrounds, outdoor fitness equipment, beach volleyball, basketball, four pickleball courts, and a tennis court.

“These parks are strategically located throughout the property and in addition to the athletic field, include sport courts, playgrounds, a dog park, plazas, and pocket parks,” the application says. “These parks complete the neighborhood as a place to live, work and play.”

The proposed McLean Crossing conceptual development plan (via Fairfax County)

With Kingston designated as Building 1, here’s a breakdown of the 11 new buildings proposed by LCOR: Read More

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